Looney Tunes Baseball

(By Chris, Editor in Chief of MyBriefs.com and the adult writer of the Gab Four. Originally published June 28, 2011, sponsored by 3 Spoons Yogurt) 

In its filthy rich history, baseball has had its share of memorable characters and looney tunes, none more so than the actual Looney Tunes.

Warner Brothers released the theatrical cartoon "Baseball Bugs" in 1946, in which Bugs Bunny single-handedly leads the Tea Totallers to victory against the Gas-House Gorillas. Both Bugs and the Gorillas employ numerous questionable tactics throughout the game, making this film a favorite of Alex Rodriguez to garner strategy from.

Upper Deck released two series of Looney Tunes Comic Ball cards in 1990 and 1991, showcasing characters in MLB uniforms amidst famous players.

But only standout athletes get their own action figures, making it arguably either a coronation or a lollapalooza when Applause designed two series of officially-licensed MLB figures in 1990 and 1991, featuring the Looney Tunes in team uniforms.

Each 3" tall, poseable figure was wearing a hat and jersey and was positioned either with a glove, ball or bat. Fortunately, Applause overlooked the notion to have any of the figures holding a syringe.

A dime-sized sticker featuring a team's logo was on each figure's base, indicating exactly which club had the support of Elmer Fudd.

Apparently, the Looney Tunes were non-committal with choosing teams to support, as there were only nine characters used to represent two teams apiece (one each in the National and American leagues) for a total of 18 figures.

Bugs Bunny was festooned in Dodgers and Angels gear, Daffy Duck was a Reds and A's fan, Fudd supported the Giants and Tigers, Porky Pig wore Astros and Indians uniforms, Road Runner donned the Mets and Royals colors, Sylvester was dressed in Cardinals and Red Sox jerseys, Tasmanian Devil rooted for the Cubs and Yankees, Tweety sung for the Phillies and Orioles and Yosemite Sam modeled Pirates and Twins merchandise.

It was somewhat disappointing that each Looney Tune was faced with a conundrum of having to split their allegiance between two teams. I would have rather seen additional PVCs of Michigan J. Frog, Foghorn Leghorn or the kangaroo that Sylvester confused for a giant mouse. Obviously, I was in the minority.

And of the then-26 teams in MLB, eight franchises were deemed unmarketable enough to have a Looney Tune wearing their uniform. This meant that children were spared from confusing Tasmanian Devil in a poo-poo brown Padres uniform to being covered in actual fecal matter. But I found it difficult to accept not having a Texas Rangers figure and contemplated raising my voice.

I first saw the figures at Six Flags in Arlington, Texas, which shares a parking lot with the Rangers. Forced with having to choose between no figure or a figure wearing the opposition's colors, I quickly decided to forever make my shelf a home to a Mets-edition Road Runner and Yankees-edition Taz, as I determined that I would not enjoy my life as much if it did not include a plastic representation of a Looney Tune in baseball gear.

Baseball may not be the Great American Pastime anymore. However, judging from the Looney Tunes' need to have Michael Jordan bail them out while playing basketball in "Space Jam" to their complete void of talent in other sports, it is clear that baseball is still the Great Animation Pastime.

Chris is a Waco, Texas, resident, Editor in Chief of MyBriefs.com, author of the book "Sports Briefs" and the adult writer for the Gab Four. Read more of Chris' solo columns here.
https://twitter.com/mybriefschris
 
http://www.spoonsyogurt.com/

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